Sep
28
to Nov 26

Framing Community: Magnum Photos, 1947–Present

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Framing Community: Magnum Photos, 1947 Present

Curated by Prof. Maria Antonella Pelizzari with graduate students enrolled in the Advanced Curatorial Certificate

September 29–November 26, 2017
Opening Reception: September 28, 2017, 7­–9pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

On the occasion of Magnum Photos’ 70th Anniversary, the Hunter College Art Galleries presents Framing Community: Magnum Photos, 1947–Present, an exhibition that revisits the history of the cooperative photo agency, focusing on the idea of “Community”—a subject that has been central to the practice of photographers and continues to be crucial in our time. 

Framing Community features a selection of seventeen visions and narratives representing communities in a conflicted, dispersed, and racially fractured state. The subjects of this photo exhibition are searching to belong, while living in exile and navigating shifting politics and identities. Organized into four thematic sections: Longing for Community, Shifting Community, Contested Territories, and Displaced Community, the exhibition includes works by photographers Bruno Barbey, René Burri, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Bruce Davidson, Bieke Depoorter, Carl de Keyzer, Paul Fusco, Jim Goldberg, Thomas Hoepker, Josef Koudelka, Susan Meiselas, Alessandra Sanguinetti, David Seymour, Alec Soth, Larry Towell, Peter van Agtmael and Alex Webb. 

Magnum Photos, founded in 1947 on the shared belief in humanist values, has seen a world in increasing disarray at the brink of social change, alienated by divisive politics and migrations.  Photographers, witnesses of these fluctuating conditions, have demonstrated a creative sensibility and individual engagement, generating images that have marked history. These photographers’ wide range of approaches to social documentary is relevant in regard to an idea of community that has radically changed in the seven decades of the history of Magnum. If the first years were marked by a universalist utopia that celebrated human sameness, across these decades, photographers have increasingly questioned their position as outsiders looking in, negotiating religious and political diversity while seeking trust from within these various communities. 

Framing Community: Magnum Photos, 1947–Present was developed over a two-semester curatorial seminar, led by Art History Professor Maria Antonella Pelizzari, and is the result of an exceptional team effort by the graduate students involved in the Advanced Curatorial Certificate at Hunter College. In addition to the exhibition, the class produced a comprehensive catalogue, published by Hirmer Verlag and available through University of Chicago Press and Thames and Hudson. 

Framing Community: Magnum Photos, 1947–Present is made possible by the generous support of the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., The Crossways Foundation, Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg, the Leubsdorf Fund, Linda Macklowe, and Agnes Gund in support of the Curatorial Certificate Program.

ABOUT THE ADVANCED CURATORIAL CERTIFICATE
Hunter’s Department of Art & Art History has long provided its graduate students the opportunity to work with faculty and our galleries’ professional staff on exhibitions of exceptional quality.  The new Advanced Certificate in Curatorial Studies builds on that tradition and the curatorial interests and ambitions of Hunter faculty and students—and our commitment to exhibitions whose themes, theses, and checklists have been developed and honed by our students. The program is designed to offer both a theoretical and historical grounding in curatorial practices and practical experience in exhibition organization and display and object research and preservation. Every student enrolled in the certificate program has the opportunity to work on an exhibition from inception to fruition, whether in the annual Curatorial Seminar or in faculty-supervised guided internships in the Hunter College Art Galleries or in museums and galleries beyond the College.

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Jun
21
to Aug 20

Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno

Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno

June 21–August 20, 2017
Opening reception: Wednesday, June 21, 5–8pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

On the evening of the June 21st summer solstice, Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno—the first major U.S. exhibition about the American poet, artist, activist and muse John Giorno—will open simultaneously across 13 locations in New York City. I ♥ John Giorno is a work of art by Giorno’s husband, the Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone. The exhibition is a celebration of the life and work of John Giorno—an artist whose work has influenced generations. Taking place in his chosen hometown, the exhibition affords a unique opportunity for Giorno’s contributions to be recognized within the canons of American poetry and art history, and celebrates the artist’s 80th birthday. 

I ♥ John Giorno is an unprecedented collaboration between leading non-profit and alternative spaces across New York, which are joining forces for the first time to mount a multilayered exhibition on a single subject. Partner venues include: Artists SpaceHigh Line ArtHowl! HappeningHunter College Art GalleriesThe KitchenNew MuseumRed Bull Arts New YorkRubin Museum of ArtSky ArtSwiss Institute, White Columns, and 80WSE Gallery. Reconfigured as a festival, including installations in galleries and public spaces, as well as a full roster of public programs and events, I ♥ John Giorno is free and open to the public. 

Expanding upon the exhibition that took place at Palais de Tokyo in Paris from October 2015 to January 2016, I ♥ John Giorno has been re-conceptualized specifically for New York, highlighting Giorno’s significant relationship with the city, and his singular role in creating and fostering community here. The 18-part exhibition has been divided by Rondinone into chapters reflecting the layers of Giorno’s life and work, his longstanding influence on and dedication to his chosen hometown of New York City, and his relationships with artist friends, lovers and collaborators including: Richard Bosman, Phong Bui, Angela BullochAnne CollierVerne DawsonJudith EislerJohn GiornoMark HandforthMatthew HiggsPierre HuygheFrançoise JanicotScott KingElizabeth PeytonUgo RondinoneErik SatieKendall ShawMichael StipeBilly SullivanRirkrit Tiravanija, Peter Ungerleider,  Joan Wallace, and Andy Warhol, whose work will be presented as part of the festival.

The exhibition format echoes the symbiotic relationship between Ugo Rondinone and John Giorno, who have been both partners and collaborators for the past two decades. Rondinone describes the show saying: “I ♥ John Giorno is a kaleidoscopic exhibition about the life and work of American poet and Tibetan Buddhist John Giorno, whose rich and stimulating life has woven many threads of American culture and spirituality. Within the dreamscape of the exhibition, one is invited to wander through the juxtaposed realm of art and poetry where image and language build upon themselves in a layered stream of consciousness driven by the biographical, the conceptual, and the emotional.”    

I ♥ John Giorno is made possible in part by public funds from Pro Helvetia, Swiss Arts Council. The I ♥ John Giorno organizing committee gratefully acknowledges generous support from Van Cleef & Arpels and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Thanks to Almine Rech Gallery, Brussels, London, New York and Paris; Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Galerie Eva Presenhuber, New York and Zürich; Gladstone Gallery, Brussels and New York; Galerie Kamel Mennour, London and Paris; Kukje Gallery, Seoul; and Sadie Coles, London for production support. Additional thanks to Ophelia and Bill Rudin as well as the General Consulate of Switzerland in New York for their gracious contribution, and to agnès b. for in kind support.

ABOUT JOHN GIORNO
John Giorno (b. 1936, New York City, USA) is an artistic innovator who has been defying conventional definitions of poet, performer, political activist, Tibetan Buddhist, and visual artist since he emerged upon the New York art scene during the late 1950s. In the 1960s, he began producing multi-media, multi-sensory events concurrent with Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable. He worked with Rauschenberg’s Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T) in 1966, and with Bob Moog in 1967-68. His breakthroughs in this area include Dial-A-Poem, which was first presented in 1968 at the Architectural Society of New York, and was later included in the MoMA’s Information exhibition in 1970. His contributions are significant to many culturally defining moments: the Beat generation, Pop Art, Punk, the Pictures Generation, and the hip-hop era. His work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Musée National d´Art Moderne, Paris; and Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane; among others.

ABOUT UGO RONDINONE
go Rondinone (b. 1964, Brunnen, Switzerland) is a renowned mixed-media artist who lives and works in New York. Recent solo shows include: your age my age and the age of the rainbow, The Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow; let’s start this day again, Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; every time the sun comes up, Place Vendome, Paris; girono d’oro + notti d’argento, Mercati die Traiano, Rome; becoming soil, Carre d’Art, Nîmes; seven magic mountains, Art Production Fund and Nevada Museum of Art/Desert of Nevada; vocabulary of solitude, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam; Ugo Rondinone: I ♡ John Giorno, Palais de Tokyo, Paris; golden days and silver nights, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; and artists and poets, Secession, Vienna. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and the Dallas Museum of Art, among others. Upcoming shows include the world just makes me laugh at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley; and good evening beautiful blue at Bass Museum of Art, Miami.

Ugo Rondinone: I ♡ John Giorno is made possible in part by public funds from the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia. The I ♡ John Giorno organizing committee gratefully acknowledges generous support from Van Cleef & Arpels, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and LUMA Foundation. Thanks to Almine Rech Gallery, Brussels, London, New York and Paris; Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Galerie Eva Presenhuber, New York and Zürich; Gladstone Gallery, Brussels and New York; Galerie Kamel Mennour, London and Paris; Kukje Gallery, Seoul; and Sadie Coles, London for production support. Additional thanks to Ophelia and Bill Rudin as well as the General Consulate of Switzerland in New York for their gracious contribution, and to agnès b. for in kind support.

JOHN GIORNO DANCING
Kendall Shaw
Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery

The Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery displays works by Kendall Shaw depicting his close friend John Giorno. In 1963, Shaw took photos of Giorno dancing that later inspired his spare paintings whose black outlines and colorful silhouettes depict Giorno’s body in motion. The works were first exhibited at the Tibor de Nagy gallery in September 1964. For the first time, a number of Shaw’s original photographs will also be exhibited alongside the paintings.  

GRASPING AT EMPTINESS
Richard Bosman and John Giorno
Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery

Also on view at the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery is Grasping at Emptiness, a collaboration featuring Giorno’s 1978 eponymous poem and 20 drawings by Richard Bosman. Bosman’s dynamic depictions of frustration evoke Giorno’s poem about a fraught end to a relationship. This book was published in 1985 by the Kulchur Foundation, an independent press and granting organization that supported poets and critics now primarily known as part of the New York School. 

JOHN GIORNO AND TIBETAN BUDDHISM
With works by John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone
205 Hudson Gallery

“When you’re a Buddhist, you work with your mind in meditation, and with various practices you train the mind to realize its empty nature. Strangely, that’s the way I make poems! Maybe it’s developing the ability to see what arises in one’s mind, how it arises and its nature, that makes Buddhism very sympathetic to poets.” — John Giorno

John Giorno was first introduced to Buddhism during his undergraduate studies at Columbia University in 1956 as part of its Core Curriculum.  After several trips to India during the 1970s, he discovered Tibetan Buddhism and became a disciple of Dudjom Rinpoche (1904–1987), master of the Nyingmapa lineage, which Giorno actively helped to promulgate in the United States. 

Every New Year since 1986, Giorno has welcomed Buddhist masters and students to his home for the traditional fire ceremony, during which the obstacles of the previous year are released to usher in the new one. For this exhibition, Giorno’s personal shrine from his home, which is decorated with intricate brocade from the sacred pilgrimage site of Benaras in India, has been relocated to the gallery space.  Additionally, selected from the collection of the Rubin Museum of Art, a group of eighteen thangkas—Tibetan paintings—are also on display along with two from Giorno’s personal collection. 

Padmasambhava, the founding figure of the Nyingmapa order, is depicted in a number of the works. Considered to be a “Second Buddha” in Tibet, Padmasambhava played a predominant role in the advancement of Buddhism across Tibet in the 8th century. Padmasambhava is endowed with superhuman qualities and shown through Tibetan iconography in a variety of forms.

Guru Pema Drakpo is one of the most wrathful depictions of Padmasambhava, an illustration of the powerful energy required to neutralize and transmute the obstacles that inevitably arise on the path to Enlightenment and spiritual accomplishment.  He holds in his hand a vajra or “Diamond Thunderbolt,” a symbol of Enlightenment and a ritual object.  Padmasambhava is believed to have been essential to the dissemination of the teachings of the Vajrakila, also known as the “Diamond Dagger,” throughout Tibet.

Conversely, Guru Pema Jungne is a more peaceful depiction of Padmasambhava. Known as the “Lotus-Born,” he is often shown sitting on a flower and dressed in the robes of a monk, teaching Dharma to the people.  In his right hand he holds a diamond scepter, while in his left he holds a skullcap of clear nectar.

AIDS TREATMENT PROJECT
With works by John Giorno, Ugo Rondinone and Peter Ungerleider
205 Hudson Gallery

205 Hudson Gallery presents material from Giorno’s AIDS Treatment Project begun in 1984. Conceived as a direct-action program, Giorno described it as “my personal effort to combat with all-pervasive compassion, the catastrophe of the AIDS epidemic. Cash grants for emergency situations: back rent, telephone and utilities, food, nursing, alternative medicine not covered by Medicaid, taxis, whatever is needed. Money given with love and affection.”

Facilitated through his non-profit foundation, Giorno Poetry Systems, many artists in his LP series, such as William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Patti Smith, among many others, donated their royalties to the AIDS Treatment Project. Giorno also organized benefit performances at the Beacon Theater with artists including Debbie Harry, Philip Glass, Laurie Anderson and Sonic Youth; posters from these concerts are included here. The AIDS Treatment Project concluded in 2004, though Giorno has continued to help poets and artists since with medical problems.

Peter Ungerleider’s film Loving Kindness, presented with the AIDS Treatment Project documentation, is a portrait of Giorno that focuses on his work with the AIDS Treatment Project interspersed with his musings on death within the Tibetan Buddhist tradition.

Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno is made possible by the generous support of the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg, the Leubsdorf Fund, and Agnes Gund in support of the Curatorial Certificate Program.

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Apr
8
to May 7

Homecoming: Katherine Behar, Oliver Herring, Julia Jacquette, Yashua Klos

Homecoming: Katherine Behar, Oliver Herring, Julia Jacquette, Yashua Klos

Organized by Sarah Watson with Jenn Bratovich

April 8–May 7, 2017

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

The Hunter College Art Galleries are pleased to announce Homecoming, an exhibition of four Hunter Studio Art MFA alumni: Katherine Behar (MFA 2009), Oliver Herring (MFA 1991), Julia Jacquette (MFA 1992) and Yashua Klos (MFA 2009).  The exhibition, scheduled to open in conjunction with Hunter college-wide Alumni Reunion on Saturday, April 8, 2017, will be on view through Sunday, May 7, 2017.  The exhibition marks the inauguration of a new initiative, also entitled “Homecoming,” developed in collaboration with the MFA Student Organization, and designed to foster connections between current Hunter MFA students and Hunter MFA alumni in a variety of ways, including an annual exhibition in the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery.  This year’s inaugural Homecoming exhibition offers the opportunity to highlight the work of just some of Hunter’s internationally recognized alumni artists, allowing our current students to gain a greater understanding of their practice in advance of the visits, interviews, lectures, and tours that are part of the broader initiative. During this exhibition, the gallery will also collaborate with the alumni artists to organize undergraduate-specific programming.

Homecoming artists: the inaugural year includes the artists Katherine Behar (MFA 2009), Oliver Herring (MFA 1991), Julia Jacquette (MFA 1992) and Yashua Klos (MFA 2009).

Exhibitions in the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery are made possible by the generous support of the Leubsdorf Fund, the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg, and Joan and Charles Lazarus.

Katherine Behar (Hunter MFA 2009) explores issues of gender and labor in contemporary digital culture. Her work has been presented at festivals, galleries, and performance spaces throughout North America and Europe. Her survey exhibition and catalog Katherine Behar: Data's Entry | Veri Girişi was presented at the Pera Museum in Istanbul, Turkey, in 2016. A previous solo exhibition and catalog, Katherine Behar: E-Waste, premiered at the University of Kentucky in 2014 and traveled to Boston Cyberarts Gallery, MA. Since 2005 she has collaborated with Marianne M. Kim in the performance art duo Disorientalism. Behar is the editor of Object-Oriented Feminism, published by University of Minnesota Press in 2016. Her publications And Another Thing: Nonanthropocentrism and Art, coedited with Emmy Mikelson, and Bigger than You: Big Data and Obesity were published by punctum books the same year.

She has received fellowships and grants from the MacDowell Colony, the Rubin Museum of Art, the Franklin Furnace Fund, and others. Behar holds an MFA in combined media from Hunter College, an MA in media ecology from New York University, and a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is based in New York and is Assistant Professor of New Media Arts at Baruch College, CUNY.

Oliver Herring (Hunter MFA 1991) received a BFA from the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, University of Oxford, UK and an MFA from Hunter College. Throughout the 1990s, Herring became known for hand-knit Mylar and tape sculptures. Inspired by the death of playwright and drag performer Ethyl Eichelberger, the project lasted ten years, and revolved around marking time through the accumulation of incremental stitched units. In the late 1990s his practice expanded to include improvised stop-motion videos and performances that at first involved friends and eventually strangers on the street. These interactive works were counterpoints to the more stationary and solitary work practice of knitting. A few years later Herring began using volunteers and photography to create elaborately constructed fragmented three-dimensional photo sculptures. Much of his recent work involves human interaction, progressing towards unexpected and/or unpredictable finales.

In 2002, Herring created the improvisatory art event TASK, an ongoing series of events, workshops and parties in which participants of all ages and demographics collectively dream up instructions and carry them out with the materials provided. Increasingly, TASK has become a tool in classrooms and communities to access contemporary art in ways that are experimental, open-ended, and accessible to anyone.

Herring’s work has been exhibited widely. In the United States, his work has been shown at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of Art, New York; Performa 09, New York; the Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Baltimore Museum of Art, MD; The Frye Art Museum, Seattle, WA; the Blanton Art Museum, Austin, TX; and the Denver Art Museum, CO. Elsewhere, he has exhibited at the Camden Art Center, London, UK; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK; The Kyoto Art Center, Japan; the 10th Lyon Biennale, France; Configura II, Erfurt, Germany; and the 2010 Aichi Triennale, Nagoya, Japan. Me Us Them, a fifteen-year survey of Herring's work, was organized in 2009 at the Tang Museum, Saratoga Springs, NY.

Julia Jacquette (Hunter MFA 1992) is an American artist based in New York City and Amsterdam. Her work has been shown extensively at galleries and museums around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA; and the RISD Museum, Providence, RI, among other institutions. Jacquette’s work was included in the first installment of MoMA PS1's Greater New York exhibition, and was the subject of a retrospective at the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs, NY. She has taught at the Rhode Island School of Design and Princeton University, and is currently on the faculty at the Fashion Institute of Technology, New York. Jacquette’s work is currently the subject of a major museum retrospective at the Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College, Clinton, NY. Unrequited and Acts of Play comprises paintings, site-specific murals, and a series of gouache drawings.

Yashua Klos (Hunter MFA 2009) was born in 1977 in Chicago, IL. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Klos obtained an MFA at Hunter College, and a BFA at Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL. He was awarded a New York Foundation for the Arts grant in 2015 and the Joan Mitchell Award in 2014.

Klos’s solo shows include Blank Black, Galerie Anne De Villepoix Paris, FR, 2016; How To Hide in the Wind, Papillion Art, Los Angeles, CA (2016); As Below, So Above, Jack Tilton Gallery, New York (2015); and We Come Undone, Jack Tilton Gallery, New York (2013). Other recent group shows include: Imagine, Brand New Gallery, Milan, Italy (2016); Broken English, Tyburn Gallery, London, UK (2015); To Be Young, Gifted, and Black, curated by Hank Willis Thomas, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa (2015); In Plain Sight, Opa Locka ARC, Florida (2014); Draw 2014 Symposium, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (2014); and Fore, Studio Museum Harlem in Harlem, New York (2012). Klos has participated in the residency programs at Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, NE; Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, TV; and Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, Skowhegan, ME.

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Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975
Sep
22
to Nov 20

Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975

Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass 1972–1975

Curated by Thierry de Duve, Evelyn Kranes Kossak Professor of Art History

September 22–November 20, 2016
Opening Reception: Thursday, September 22, 6–8pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Curated by Thierry de Duve, Evelyn Kranes Kossak Professor of Art History, Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975 presents an important and under-recognized series from the artist’s oeuvre. This exhibition will provide a critical examination of this series in relationship with the broader art historical context of global conceptualism and minimalism dominant in the late 1960s and 1970s. Tevet’s works on glass are both unique and perfectly in tune with the experiments conducted internationally by the most advanced artists of their time. They are radically modernist in every sense: uncompromising, experimental, and taking their own conventions as their subject matter.

These works consist of unframed glass planes with pieces of paper, cardboard, and tape affixed to either front or back of the glass. The works are suspended by wire or twine attached to metal clips clamped around the edges of the glass, often exposing their rudimentary hanging system. They evolved out of drawings Tevet was making as preparatory sketches for equally radical objects—which he called sculptures, but which evoke furniture—and can be seen as an Arte Povera version of Donald Judd’s “specific objects.” Eventually, the drawings and their tentative glass framing devices became works in their own right, with a status separate from the artist’s other works.  

Of Tevet’s works on glass there are some thirty known extant pieces. In 1975, thirteen were exhibited at Galerie Schmela in Düsseldorf, however, this body of work has never been shown as a comprehensive series. Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975 brings the glass works together for the first time, expanding the understanding of Tevet's oeuvre and its historical context, while also introducing his work to new audiences. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated publication that functions as a catalogue raisonné of the works on glass. The gallery will host a full roster of public programs in conjunction with the show.

Nahum Tevet (born 1946 in Kibbutz Messilot, Israel) has lived and worked in Tel Aviv since 1973. His work has been the topic of several solo exhibitions including Walking on The Wall, Nahum Tevet Small Sculptures, 1980–2012, Tel Aviv University Art Gallery, 2012; Nahum Tevet, Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma (MACRO), 2008; Nahum Tevet: Works, 1994–2006, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, 2007; Nahum Tevet: Take Two, Le Quartier, Center for Contemporary Art, Quimper, France, 2005; and Opening Moves, Nahum Tevet Sculptures, Museum of Modern Art, Ludwig Foundation, Vienna, 1997.  His work is included in many important museum collections including The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA; Portland Art Museum, Portland, OR; Museum of Modern Art, Ludwig Foundation, MUMOK, Vienna, Austria; Kaiser Wilhelm Museum, Krefeld, Germany; FRAC Bretagne, France; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; and Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv. Tevet has received several distinguished awards including the EMET Prize for Art, Science and Culture, The Office of The Prime Minister of Israel & A.M.N Foundation, 2013; the Dizengoff Prize for Painting and Sculpture, Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality, 2011; and the Minister of Culture and Science Prize for Life Achievement in Art, 2013. In addition to his studio practice, Tevet has a sustained commitment to teaching. He was a professor in the Fine Art Department at Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Tel Aviv Branch, from 1980 to 2013, serving as Head of the Master’s Degree Program in Fine Art from 2001 to 2010. 

Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975 will travel to Muzeum Sztuki in Łódź, Poland, January 27–April 23, 2017.

This exhibition is made possible by the generous support provided by the Artis Grant Program; The Friends of Bezalel, Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem; Carol and Arthur Goldberg; Evelyn Kranes Kossak; Joan and Charles Lazarus; the Leubsdorf Fund; and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

Press
Art Forum
Art in America
Art Net
Blouin Art Info
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Bayadères for Two Skywalks: A site-specific work by Daniel Buren
Mar
15
to Dec 31

Bayadères for Two Skywalks: A site-specific work by Daniel Buren

Photo-souvenir: Bayadères for Two Skywalks, March 2016, work in situ, Hunter College, New York, NY, United States, March–December 2016. © Daniel Buren/ADAGP, Paris. Photo by Bill Orcutt.
 

Bayadères for Two Skywalks: A site-specific work by Daniel Buren

On view through Saturday December 31, 2016

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

“It is by working for a given exhibition site that the work in situ—and it alone—opens up the field for a possible transformation of the very place itself.” — Daniel Buren

Daniel Buren (b. 1938) is a French artist whose work is rooted in the avant-garde conceptual practices of the 1960s. Buren has long engaged in creating large-scale site-specific works, conceiving and executing these works in response to their specific architectural and institutional setting and using these elements as cues for reimagining the space. For Hunter College, Buren has transformed the iconic skywalks into prismatic passageways, rendering a familiar space unfamiliar. This intervention creates an opportunity to engage with the architecture in a new way—prompting questions about how we experience color, light, and space and how those elements alter the social and physical environment. As in all of Buren’s site-specific work, the artwork itself is only completed through interaction, eliciting the viewers’ intellectual, emotional, and sensorial response as they move through the space.

This work is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Buren, Mosset, Parmentier, Toroni, on view at the Hunter College, 205 Hudson Street Gallery in Tribeca, through April 10, 2016. This exhibition—the first critical examination of the significant, albeit brief, work of the four artists in 1967—seeks to reexamine the group by placing its work in context with the broader conversations surrounding institutional critique, performance, and the role of painting as a political medium.

Bayadères for Two Skywalks is made possible by LVMH / Moët Hennessy–Louis Vuitton with additional support from the David Bershad Family Foundation and Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc.; the Brant Foundation, Inc.; Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg; Andrew and Christine Hall; the Hunter College Foundation; Stephen King, C12 Capital Management; the Anna Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; President Jennifer J. Raab; and an anonymous donor.

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Olivier Mosset
Mar
4
to May 8

Olivier Mosset

Installation by Olivier Mosset

Organized by Sarah Watson, Annie Wischmeyer with Jocelyn Spaar

March 4–May 8, 2016
Opening reception: March 3, 6–8pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

This site-specific installation by Olivier Mosset includes selected works from three integral series in the artist’s oeuvre: monochrome paintings, murals, and custom motorcycles. The installation layers these varied bodies of work, prompting a dialogue that explores Mosset’s interest in materiality and surface as they relate to the history of the readymade.

The installation is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Buren, Mosset, Parmentier, Toroni currently on view at the Hunter College, 205 Hudson Street Gallery in Tribeca. The exhibition is the first critical examination of the significant, albeit brief, work of the BMPT Group, comprising Daniel Buren, Olivier Mosset, Michel Parmentier, and Niele Toroni in 1967, and seeks to reexamine the BMPT group by placing its work in context with the broader conversations surrounding institutional critique, performance, and the role of painting as a political medium.

Born in 1944 in Bern, Switzerland, Mosset spent his early artistic career in Paris. He was a member of the BMPT Group in 1967, and the Zanzibar group from 1968–69. Moving to New York City in the early 1970s, he was affiliated with the Radical Painting group and later, in the 1980s with the Neo-Geo artists. For the past twenty years, Mosset has lived and worked between Brooklyn and Tuscon, Arizona.

The Hunter College Art Galleries are pleased to announce that Olivier Mosset will be a spring 2016 Judith Zabar Visiting Artist at Hunter College. The Judith Zabar Visiting Artist Program allows Hunter to bring a series of internationally recognized artists to campus to work directly with students in the MFA and MA programs, providing students with the unique opportunity to interact with top practitioners in the field. Mosset will engage with students through master classes, critical seminars, workshops and private tutorials. In addition, Mosset will participate in a public panel discussion to take place in early May, details are forthcoming. 

This exhibition is made possible by the David Bershad Family Foundation and Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc.; The Brant Foundation, Inc.; Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg; Andrew and Christine Hall; The Hunter College Foundation; Stephen King, C12 Capital Management; Anna Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; President Jennifer J. Raab; and an anonymous donor. 

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Boundless Reality: Landscapes of Latin America
Oct
30
to Jan 23

Boundless Reality: Landscapes of Latin America

Installation view: Boundless Reality: Traveler Artists’ Landscapes of Latin America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection, Hunter College Art Galleries, 2015. Photo by Enrique Shore.
 

Boundless Reality
Traveler Artists’ Landscapes of Latin America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection

Curated by Harper Montgomery, Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Professor of Modern & Contemporary Latin American Art 

On view at the Leubsdorf Gallery and Americas Society

October 30, 2015–January 23, 2016
Opening reception: October 28, 5–7pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Boundless Reality: Traveler Artists’ Landscapes of Latin America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection is the culmination of a multiyear collaborative effort between Hunter College, The Graduate Center at City University of New York (CUNY), Americas Society, and the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC). The exhibition is organized by the Hunter College Art Galleries and curated by Dr. Harper Montgomery, the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Professor of Latin American Art and students from her master’s course, Curatorial Practicum: Subjectivity and the Nineteenth-Century Latin American Landscape. The exhibition includes a selection of major works from the collection Traveler Artists to Latin America, which Gustavo Cisneros and Patricia Phelps de Cisneros began in 1997. The works span three and a half centuries of Latin American landscape art, from the arrival of Dutch Colonial artist Frans Post to Brazil, and continuing with the visits of numerous traveling artists from Europe and the United States. By the late nineteenth century native-born artists were adopting landscape painting as the language of the new republics, forging a new sense of national identity.

“When my wife Patty and I began collecting landscapes of Latin America by traveler artists to and within the region, we recognized that the images they recorded represented a way to perceive a world whose boundaries transcended political borders. They further provided an understanding of Latin America as a network of interconnected ideas, traditions, and fruitful exchange,” said Fundación Cisneros/Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Co-founder Gustavo Cisneros. “The responsibility of the collector to preserve the heritage of artworks involves more than the crucial work of caring for them physically. It involves giving them new avenues of correspondence with other works of art and other traditions, and creating new scholarship that reveals previously unseen connections and discovers new facts. Patty and I are especially proud of the students whose research and curatorial work contributed to this exhibition. Their work has added important gains to the intellectual preservation that will allow these works to live for a new generation, who will no doubt discover in them national identities with more in common than previously imagined.”

The show includes drawings, watercolors, paintings, photographs, and books by key figures including Ferdinand Bellermann, Frederic Edwin Church, Marc Ferrez, Auguste Morisot, Camille Pissarro, and José María Velasco among others. Two paintings in the exhibition by Frans Post and a book by Willem Piso predate the nineteenth century, but most of the works in the exhibition were made during the 1830s, ’40s, and ’50s, the years following the Latin American wars of independence.

Boundless Reality: Traveler Artists’ Landscapes of Latin America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection is organized in two distinct but related sections. The installation at the Leubsdorf Gallery at Hunter College presents works that convey to what extent the European tradition of landscape painting underwent changes in the process of being applied to represent Latin American landscapes. Auguste Morisot’s 1886 expedition up the Orinoco River serves as the centerpiece of Americas Society Art Gallery’s component of the exhibition, which includes photographs, drawings, and prints. Morisot’s archive exemplifies the emergence of photography in the nineteenth century and its relationship to the conventions of painting and representing the exotic landscape.

Boundless Reality serves as an exploration into a genre that is receiving increasing scholarly attention. While Alexander von Humboldt’s observations on the aesthetics of the continent’s extraordinary scenery were influential, it was only after the colonies obtained independence from Spain that the New World opened up to the gaze of foreign artists who arrived individually, drawn by their own aesthetic interests, or collectively in commercial missions dispatched by foreign governments. The artists’ renderings document the ways in which travelers encountered and experienced the region as well as the challenges they faced to describe an aesthetic reality for which the language of conventional Western art was inadequate. 

The title of the exhibition is inspired by a reflection by the Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez, who stated that language was not enough to describe the “boundless reality” that is conveyed by the extraordinarily rich nature of Latin America and the Caribbean. Boundless Reality reveals that the landscape tradition was not reserved for artists who traveled great distances to record the geography and the people they encountered in the Torrid Zone. It includes native-born artists who drew in the European landscape tradition to reflect on their own culture, as exemplified by José María Velasco’s paintings of Mexico, which not only embrace the European Enlightenment sensibility, but also a growing sense of national identity.

“This project brings to light new research on an area whose enormous artistic interest and scholarly importance are just now coming to be recognized by art historians and scholars. Viewing these landscapes by artists of many different origins suggests that, even though their orientations may differ, the demands of representing Latin America generated a transnational language that was well suited to the new nineteenth-century capability for enormous mobility,” said Dr. Montgomery.

Traveler Artists: Landscapes of Latin America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection, an authoritative new book on the early history of landscape painting in Latin America, is published on the occasion of this exhibition. This richly illustrated volume introduces informative new essays on the paintings and drawings from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros—including some works that are not on view in the exhibition. The publication contributes new scholarship to this burgeoning field and offers original research on fifty-two artworks by such key figures as Frans Post, Frederick Edwin Church, José María Velasco, and Auguste Morisot, many of which are reproduced for the first time. Graduate students from Hunter College, CUNY, and the Graduate Center, CUNY, contributed research and texts to the publication. 

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Because I Would Not Stop for Death–Anthony Panzera, Memento Mori Paintings
Jul
31
to Sep 26

Because I Would Not Stop for Death–Anthony Panzera, Memento Mori Paintings

Installation view: Because I Would Not Stop for Death–Anthony Panzera, Memento Mori Paintings, Hunter College Art Galleries, 2015. Photo by Louis Chan.
 

Because I Would Not Stop for Death–Anthony Panzera, Memento Mori Paintings

Curated by Sarah Watson, Annie Wischmeyer and Jocelyn Spaar with curatorial assistance by Joy Scanlon, Undergraduate Fellow

July 31–September 26, 2015
Opening Reception: July 30, 5–7pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Primarily a figurative painter and printmaker, Anthony Panzera (born 1941) has taught for more than forty years at Hunter College in the Department of Art and Art History. Because I Could Not Stop for Death—Anthony Panzera, Memento Mori Paintings marks the first pedagogically based presentation of the artist’s studio practice, displaying each painting alongside the preparatory drawings and studies that facilitated its making. Heavily influenced by Italian Renaissance masters such as Leonardo da Vinci, Panzera has spent many decades building a body of work based on careful observation. 

The memento mori motif, which refers to the representation of symbolic objects to remind the viewer of the transience of life’s pleasures and the inevitability of death, has played a vital role in the history of painting.  Similarly, using objects to evoke both the history of art as well as a personal history, Panzera’s Memento Mori series functions not to reify any particular narrative, but instead to remind the viewer of the inescapable onward march of time.

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Robert Motherwell and the New York School at Hunter
Feb
12
to May 2

Robert Motherwell and the New York School at Hunter

Installation view: Robert Motherwell and the New York School at Hunter, Hunter College Art Galleries, 2015. Photo by Bill Orcutt.
 

Robert Motherwell and the New York School at Hunter

Curated by Howard Singerman, Phyllis and Joseph Caroff Chair, Department of Art and Art History with Sarah Watson, Acting Director and Curator, and Annie Wischmeyer, Assistant Curator with curatorial assistance by Jocelyn Spaar, Curatorial Assistant and Irini Zervas, Graduate Fellow

February 12–May 2, 2015
Opening reception: February 14, 5–7pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Robert Motherwell recounts that in 1951, Edna Wells Luetz, the newly appointed Chair of Hunter’s Department of Art, reached out to the Museum of Modern Art’s founding curator, Alfred Barr, in search of “a modern artist, and one who is articulate.” This marked the beginning of Hunter College’s commitment to artists as teachers, and to hiring artists fully engaged in the questions of the art of their time.  Barr recommended Motherwell, and at Motherwell’s urging, Luetz would bring to Hunter a number of artists associated with the New York School. The artists included in this exhibition are William Baziotes, Fritz Bultman, Richard Lippold, Robert Motherwell, Ray Parker, and George Sugarman. This remarkable cohort defined the fundamental aesthetic and professional ambitions of Hunter’s art department, and affirmed its commitment to creative practice.

In addition to a selection of works by Motherwell and the artists he brought to Hunter College, the exhibition will offer a collection of archival materials to make the case for the aesthetic and intellectual remaking of Hunter’s Art Department. His syllabi and lecture notes and those of others, particularly Baziotes, whom Luetz hired on Motherwell’s recommendation in 1952, document a new thrust in teaching, one that situated the problems of the modern artist at the center of a young artist’s education. Among other archival materials the exhibition will include is an unpublished statement Motherwell drafted in the mid-1950s, entitled “The Aim of the Art Department at Hunter College.” 

This unique exhibition documents Motherwell’s role in permanently transforming Hunter’s Department of Art and Art History through the dedicated modern painters and sculptors he brought to the faculty. Through the works of Motherwell and his colleagues, as well as the archival materials assembled here, the exhibition makes clear how intricately interwoven the history of Hunter’s art department and the story of modern art in New York are.

Robert Motherwell and the New York School at Hunter is made possible with the generous support of the Dedalus Foundation.

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Gego and Gerd Leufert: A Dialogue
Oct
3
to Nov 22

Gego and Gerd Leufert: A Dialogue

Installation view: Gego and Gerd Leufert: A Dialogue, Hunter College Art Galleries, 2014. Photo by Peter Butler.
 

Gego and Gerd Leufert: A Dialogue

Curated by Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães
Organized by Sarah Watson and Annie Wischmeyer

October 3–November 22, 2014
Opening Reception: October 2, 7–9pm 

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Gego (Gertrude Goldschmidt, Venezuelan, born Germany, 1912–1994) and Gerd Leufert (Venezuelan, born Lithuania, 1914–1998) are among the most significant artists that worked with the language of abstraction during the second half of the twentieth century in Venezuela. The exhibition Gego and Gerd Leufert: A Dialogue highlights the artists’ development and reciprocal influence through a selection of core works produced from 1964 to 1990. The show explores shared motifs in the production of each of these artists, most notably their use of the line as a means of enhancing the visual potentiality of empty spaces in two- or three-dimensional form. The partnership between Gego and Leufert resulted in lifelong mutual support that concurrently nurtured their personal relationship and their independent careers as artists. Gego and Gerd Leufert: A Dialogue provides a long-overdue, tandem examination of the artists’ works; the exhibition unveils an underlying, parallel dialogue of nonobjective language within their organic forms, linear structures, and systematic, spatial investigations. Both ultimately became pioneers in their field and had a long-lasting impact on future generations of artists at national and international levels.

The opening of Gego and Gerd Leufert: A Dialogue coincides with the centenary celebration of the artists’ births. This unique timing opens the door for continued critical discussion of their significant roles in modern art history.

Gego was born Gertrude Goldschmidt in Hamburg, Germany, in 1912, and migrated to Venezuela in 1939, fleeing Nazi Germany. Trained as an architect at the Technische Hochschule (Technical School) of Stuttgart, now the Universität Stuttgart, she graduated in 1938 with a degree in engineering and began her career in Caracas working at several architectural firms. Gego maintained her practice of painting and drawing, and in the early 1950s, she abandoned her architectural work to pursue art full-time. In 1954 she exhibited for the first time in Venezuela at the XV Salón Oficial Anual de Arte Venezolano (XV Annual Official Salon of Venezuelan Art) at the Museo de Bellas Artes (Museum of Fine Arts), Caracas, and earned her first solo show in 1958. In the following decade, she explored the relationship between line, space, and volume using a nonobjective language. She continued to develop her visual vocabulary, working in engraving and sculpture and fastidiously conducting investigations of spheres and cubes; the overall dynamism created by her lines set her apart from her peers. From 1963 to 1967 Gego focused on refining her printing technique with grant-funded trips to print workshops at the Pratt Institute in New York and the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles. At the 1967 XXVIII Salón Oficial Anual de Arte Venezolano (XXVIII Official Annual Salon of Venezuelan Art) she was awarded a prize for her lithographs. In 1979 she received Venezuela’s Premio Nacional de Artes Plásticas (National Fine Arts Prize), and in 1981, her installation Reticulárea (Reticula [Nets] + Area) was permanently installed at the Galería de Arte Nacional (National Art Gallery), Caracas. Gego’s oeuvre was iconic among her contemporaries, proponents of Venezuelan geometric abstraction and kinetic art, such as Jesús Rafael Soto and Alejandro Otero, and post-war Constructivists. Gego passed away in Caracas in 1994.

Gerd Leufert was born in 1914 in Memel, a coastal Lithuanian town later occupied by Germany. He attended the Akademie der Bildenden Künste (Academy of Fine Arts) in Munich in 1939 where he studied graphic design and became a member of the Werkbund, an interdisciplinary association founded on the social importance of design and craftsmanship. In 1951 he migrated to Caracas, Venezuela, where he excelled as a graphic designer. His contribution to the visual arts, graphic design, and museology is paramount in Venezuela. He was credited with bringing the rigor of German design principles to the country, and was well regarded for his work as a teacher of art and graphic design in various Caracas educational institutions. From 1961 to 1973, Leufert worked at the Museo de Bellas Artes (Museum of Fine Arts), Caracas, first as a designer, rebranding the museum’s visual identity, and later as the curator of drawings and graphic design. During his tenure he developed numerous exhibitions and published nearly three hundred exhibition catalogues, of which he personally designed two hundred. During this time he also published celebrated and award-winning books, including Visibilia (1966), Imposibilia (1968), Nenias (1970), and Sin Arco (1971), which featured his groundbreaking graphic design. Upon retirement, from 1974–79, Leufert was part of a group of four designers who developed a series of postage stamps, La nueva estampilla Venezolana (The new Venezuelan stamp), which were exhibited in Venezuela and Prague. Boundless in his invention, he then focused on creating sculpture in organic materials and on a new venture into photography. In 1990 he was awarded Venezuela’s Premio Nacional de Artes Plásticas (National Fine Arts Prize), which was followed by an exhibition of his photographs at Sala RG, Caracas, curated by Miguel Arroyo (Venezuelan, 1920–2004). In the last years of his life, Leufert continued to exhibit his drawings and photographs at Centro Cultural Consolidado (Consolidated Cultural Center), Caracas (1992), Museo de Arte Contemporáneo (Museum of Contemporary Art) de Maracay Mario Abreu (1992), and Museo de Bellas Artes (Museum of Fine Arts, 1994–95). He passed away in Caracas in 1998.

This exhibition is made possible with the generous support of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, the ISLAA (Institute for Studies on Latin American Art), the GPM Fund, Solita Mishaan, Andrea and José Olympio Pereira, and the Sicardi Gallery, Houston. We are also extremely grateful for the leadership support of the Hunter College Art Galleries provided by Carol Goldberg and Agnes Gund and by an anonymous donor. 

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Héctor Fuenmayor, Citrus 6906
Apr
5
to May 3

Héctor Fuenmayor, Citrus 6906

Installation view: Héctor Fuenmayor, Citrus 6906 (Originally Amarillo Sol K7YV68, 1973–2014). Dimensions variable. Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC), Caracas and New York. Hunter College Art Galleries, 2014. Photo by Louis Chan.
 

Héctor Fuenmayor, Citrus 6906
(Originally Amarillo Sol K7YV68, 1973–2014)

Curated by Harper Montgomery, the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Professor of Latin American Art; Sarah Watson and Annie Wischmeyer

April 5–May 3, 2014
Opening reception: April 8, 6–8pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Citrus 6906, by Héctor Fuenmayor (born 1949, Caracas, Venezuela), challenges assumptions about how works of art are created and displayed. While the work brings to mind monochromatic painting and the symbolic meaning of yellow in the western tradition—light, warmth, and luxury—it also questions our conventional understanding of art because it is a work that can be executed by anyone, anywhere. The only materials necessary to make it are yellow paint and gallery walls. Even its title—Citrus 6906—is unstable. Originally called Sunshine Yellow KYV68 after a patented color in the Sherwin Williams’s product catalog, Fuenmayor changed the name of the work to Citrus 6906 when the company decided to rename its particular yellow hue.

When it was initially installed in 1973 at the experimental gallery Sala Mendoza in Caracas, Citrus 6906 challenged prevailing trends in Venezuelan art of the 1970s: the embrace of material technology and geometric abstraction. In a context where abstract, colorful sculpture and murals were commissioned by the government and corporations to embellish Caracas’s modern urban environment, Citrus 6906 playfully confounded this enthusiasm for modernity.

Citrus 6906 invites multiple interpretations. Although Fuenmayor created the installation prior to his study of Zen Buddhism in the early 1980s, it relates to his subsequent spiritual practice. Citrus 6906, he has said, “has strengthened in me the idea of ‘previous life data.’ ” The methods of Buddhist meditation Fuenmayor has practiced include Guru Yoga in Tantric Hindu and Guru Yoga Tantricism in the Tibetan tradition. As an object of meditation—a unicolor Mandala—Citrus 6906 asks the viewer to focus his or her effort (sadhana) on abandoning the intellectual habit of perceiving forms as objects and emptiness as vacancy. Confounding the difference between emptiness and form, Citrus 6906 shows us that color is neither contained in a space, nor applied to the surfaces of its walls. Instead color constitutes the substance of space itself.

Since the early 1970s, Fuenmayor has created conceptual works employing painting, drawing, installation, and photography. He studied art at the Cristóbal Rojas School of Visual and Applied Arts in 1966, and had his first solo exhibition in 1973 in Caracas, showing there regularly through the 1970s. His work has been exhibited at the Fifth Havana Biennial, Cuba (1994); the Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin (1997); the Americas Society, New York (2005); and CIFO, Miami (2007). Fuenmayor’s works are in numerous collections including the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC), Caracas and New York; the Galería de Arte Nacional, Caracas; the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Caracas; and the Fundación Museo de Arte Moderno Jesús Soto, Ciudad Bolívar. Citrus 6906, included in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros was recently shown in 2013 as part of the exhibition La Invención concreta: Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid.

The exhibition is made possible by the generous support of Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.

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ART21–William Kentridge: Six Drawing Lessons
Feb
28
to Mar 22

ART21–William Kentridge: Six Drawing Lessons

ART21–William Kentridge: Six Drawing Lessons

February 28–March 22, 2014
Opening Reception: February 28, 6–8pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Muse Scholar Program partners with Hunter College Art Galleries 

The Muse Scholar Program partnered with The Hunter College Art Galleries to organize the exhibition of ART21—William Kentridge: Six Drawing Lessons. From February 28–March 22, 2014, the six lectures are being screened continuously in the 68th Street gallery.

The Six Drawing Lessons lectures were filmed in 2012 at Harvard University, where Kentridge presented at the school’s Mahindra Humanities Center. ART21, the award-winning nonprofit producers of Art in the Twenty-First Century, has distributed Six Drawing Lessons, each of which spans a wide range of ideas and includes vivid examples of Kentridge’s works.

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1955, Kentridge is a multidisciplinary artist who has had major exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and many other museums and cultural institutions around the world.

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